Category Archives: Invitation

Jump-start DH grants via “Resilient Networks” (apply by Friday October 14)

resilient-networks-banner-image

Digital humanists participating in a library workshop [image originally posted here].

As previously announced on this blog, GW has been awarded a substantial Andrew W. Mellon grant to support “Resilient Networks to Support Inclusive Digital Humanities.” Competitive jump-start grants of $5000 are now being offered to member-institution faculty pursuing digital humanities projects!

Read more about the scale and scope of the Mellon grant here. If you wish to apply for one of these jump-start grants, visit the official link and online application at the GW Libraries site.

Composing Disability: Crip Ecologies, April 7-8, 2016

Sunaura Taylor, Arctic Wheelchair, 2013. Watercolor and Ink on Paper, 7

Sunaura Taylor, Arctic Wheelchair, 2013. Watercolor and Ink on Paper, 7″ x 10″

[Cross-posted from the GW English blog]

George Washington University’s biennial Composing Disability Conference returns in Spring 2016 with the theme of  “Crip Ecologies.”  The event will be held April 7-8, 2016; featured speakers include Sunaura Taylor and Riva Lehrer, with others to be announced soon. Crip Ecologies is sponsored by the Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion, the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, Disability Support Services, the Department of English, the University Writing Program, the GW Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute (GW MEMSI) and the GW Digital Humanities Institute (GW DHI).

We invite proposals for papers and panels for this event. 250-word abstracts for papers and 500-word abstracts for complete panels should be sent by October 31, 2015 to cripecologies@gmail.com.

EXTENDED Deadline for Abstracts: October 31, 2015

Crip Ecologies:  This symposium seeks to bring together scholars, artists, advocates, and activists working across the fields of ecocriticism, disability, and queer studies.  Our goal is to think through the queer interchanges of environments and bodies in more radical ways.  As vulnerable embodied beings that interact with our environments, we experience ourselves and others through a defining porosity: we are not only affected by the places we inhabit, but we also leave our imprint on these locations as well.  Marginalized subjects, including disabled people, often experience their lives in greater proximity to environmental threats such as toxicity, climate change, generational exposures to unsafe living conditions due to poverty, militarization, body exhausting labors as in the case of migrant workers, etc.  Further, we seek to investigate how non-normative bodies/minds can reframe what it has historically meant to be an environmentalist or “nature lover?”  Crip Ecologies will draw out these wanted, unwanted, and even unknowable intimacies with our environments as materials for new trans-historical, cross-cultural, and crip/queer research about human, non-human, organic, and inorganic relationships that mark our experiences in the world.

Possible topics include:

Composing Crip Ecologies
Crip Ecologies and Militarization/War
Crip Ecologies and Art
Crip Ecologies and Localism
Crip Ecologies and Environmental Justice
Crip Ecologies and Food Justice
Crip Ecologies and Farming
Crip Ecologies and Racial Borderlands
Crip Ecologies, Time, and Places
Crip Ecologies and the University
Toxicity, Embodiment, and Uneven Development
Queercrip Bodies in the Global South
Disaster Capitalism, the Environment, Disability
Entanglement Theory
Media Studies and Digital Interfaces
Crosscultural and Transhistorical Worldings
Race, Class, and Environmental Justice
Accessibility and Ecological Backlash
Politics of Racial/Crip/Queer/Trans Spaces
Intersectional Bodies and Policing in Security States
Class and Toxic Exposures under Neoliberalism
Rhetorics of Inclusion/Biopolitics of Exclusion
Non-productive Bodies and Alternative Practices of Everyday Life
Expendable Bodies and Economies of Neglect (Necropolitics)
Crip Mental Health Ecologies

For more information about the Composing Disability series at GW, visit this page on the Disability Support Services website and explore the Composing Disability tumblr site. You can also follow Composing Disability on Twitter (@ComposingDis) or join the community on Facebook.

Rebecca Laroche (Early Modern Recipes Online): January 12 and 13

A kind invitation from Prof. Holly Dugan (English):

I write to invite you to an informal lunch and coffee with Rebecca Laroche next Monday, January 12th and to hear her presentation on transcribing and coding archival recipes as part of the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective [EMROC] on Tuesday, January 13th at 4:45 (in my and Leah Chang’s graduate course on early modern women writers in Rome 771).

Rebecca Laroche is Associate Professor of English at the University of Corado-Colorado Springs and the author of Medical Authority and Englishwomen’s Herbal Texts, 1550- 1650 (Ashgate, 2008). She’s also a founding member of Early Modern Recipes Online, which is part of The Recipes Project. She’s a tremendous (and inspiring) resource about women writers, archival research, and digital humanities, particularly on the role of gender in digital projects that deal with the past. I know that the start of the semester is a very busy time of year, but it should be a fascinating series of conversations. I hope you can join us.

Her visit to our campus is generously funded by GWU’s Digital Humanities Institute and Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute.

Please email me (hdugan at gwu dot edu) if you’d like to attend lunch, coffee, or her presentation next week.